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Mercury Prize Betting

The Nationwide Mercury Prize for the bestBritish or Irish album of the year has become the most prestigious award The Nationwide Mercury Prize for the ‘best’ British or Irish album of the year has become the most prestigious award of its kind in Europe. The winner is chosen from a shortlist of twelve albums, announced in July, after a mixed group of broadcasters, producers and journalists have had several meetings behind closed doors to whittle down their first round of over a hundred suggestions. The award was inaugurated in 1992 as an antidote to the blandness of the Music Industry controlled ‘Brits’ ceremony and its aspiration is to showcase the cutting edge of new music.

Fans of online betting should note that the list always includes a classical, a folk and a jazz album but they never win. If a big band like Oasis is on the list they won’t win either because they will almost certainly be rewarded by the Brits. The winner will usually be worthy and represent what the judges believe to be music which is showing everyone else the way.

Controversy spices up Mercury Prize Awards Betting

There will always be room, in the arts, for controversy, whatever the selection, and this year’s offerings have already come under attack, more for what has been excluded, by the usual suspects on the fringes of the music scene. Outrage has already been expressed at the absence of Portishead and Duffy who have both produced much-praised albums this year while the presence of Adele and Estelle has caused a few raised eyebrows. On the whole, though, this year’s selection is an interesting one made more so by the absence of an obvious stand-out front-runner, as there has been in recent years.

Bookmaker favourites for Mercury Prize Betting

Bookies have hastily produced three categories from the contenders. Leading the way are Burial, Elbow, Radiohead, The Last Shadowpuppets and the Robert Plant/Alison Krauss collaboration, all at around 5/1. Adele, British Sea Power, Estelle and Laura Marling come in at 8/1 while Neon Neon, Portico Quartet and Rachel Unthank & The Winterset, at 10/1, bring up the rear.

So who’s going to win? Portico Quartet and Rachel Unthank & The Winterset are, respectively, the jazz and the folk options so you can forget them. Radiohead must be tempting to the judges but their crowning would produce a large yawn. The Shadowpuppets feature past winner, Alex Turner, frontman for the Arctic Monkeys and their album, Age of Understatement, has received both critical acclaim and commercial success so they’re in with a shout. The inclusion of Adele and Estelle is a bit of a surprise and they’re a bit too mainstream to achieve a win. British Sea Power are highly regarded and may defy the modest expectations of online betting sites while Burial and Elbow must surely figure in those with a shout to be first across the line.

So who will win the Mercury Prize?

Laura Marling has pulled off a couple of critically acclaimed albums despite being a mere twenty years old and her performance magic will stand her in good stead but let’s not forget the mighty Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. They have taken great risks in combining their diverse approaches to music making but managed to pull it off and their mix of songs, crafted by the legendary T-Bone Burnett, has received massive critical acclaim. of its kind in Europe. The winner is chosen from a shortlist of twelve albums, announced in July, after a mixed group of broadcasters, producers and journalists have had several meetings behind closed doors to whittle down their first round of over a hundred suggestions. The award was inaugurated in 1992 as an antidote to the blandness of the Music Industry controlled 'Brits' ceremony and its aspiration is to showcase the cutting edge of new music.

Music Betting fans should note that the list always includes a classical, a folk and a jazz album but they never win. If a big band like Oasis is on the list they won’t win either because they will almost certainly be rewarded by the Brits. The winner will usually be worthy and represent what the judges believe to be music which is showing everyone else the way.

There will always be room, in the arts, for controversy, whatever the selection, and this year’s offerings have already come under attack, more for what has been excluded, by the usual suspects on the fringes of the music scene. Outrage has already been expressed at the absence of Portishead and Duffy who have both produced much-praised albums this year while the presence of Adele and Estelle has caused a few raised eyebrows. You can always keep up to date on a daily basis by keeping an eye on the official Mercury Prize website. On the whole, though, this year’s selection is an interesting one made more so by the absence of an obvious stand-out front-runner, as there has been in recent years.

Bookies have hastily produced three categories from the contenders. Leading the way are Burial, Elbow, Radiohead, The Last Shadowpuppets and the Robert Plant/Alison Krauss collaboration, all at around 5/1. Adele, British Sea Power, Estelle and Laura Marling come in at 8/1 while Neon Neon, Portico Quartet and Rachel Unthank & The Winterset, at 10/1, bring up the rear.